Organic Yuzu

Wednesday, November 28th, 2012

Yuzu is my favorite fruit. The flavor and scent of this citrus fascinates many people. It can be used for many kinds of cooking. For example its ground or chopped peel can be added to soup, grilled fish. Or its juice makes a great dressing for salad when combined with other seasonings. We also put whole yuzu in the bath to enjoy its smell while hoping the essence of yuzu will make our body beautiful and keep our body warm. It is said that if you eat snacks made by pumpkin and azuki beans and take a bath with yuzu on the winter solstice day, you won’t catch a cold.

I visited Fujikawa town in Yamanashi the other day and discovered organic yuzu. They are free from chemical fertilizers, pesticides, or disinfectants last 30 years.

Yuzu sometimes taste bitter but these are not bitter at all. Growing them organically must be difficult and the price of this kind is much more expensive, though. I also learned that yuzu is good food for the people who are suffering from diabetes, high blood pressure and gout.

   

 

I heard that the town harvests a lot of good yuzu every year. The town has an old temple (probably more than 700 years old) and the priests at the temple planted yuzu to use it for shoujin cooking. The history of yuzu in this area is very old. Like many other country towns, this town doesn’t have young people to take care of agricultural production, so they ask people outside of town to help with harvesting or taking care of trees etc as volunteers. Or they invite people to gain ownership of yuzu trees. Once I wanted to plant yuzu in my garden but got discouraged having heard that it takes 18 years to harvest the first yuzu. It takes many years to get it started and once we quit doing it, it can get out of hand or wither very quickly. We have to do all we can do to keep the land free from any kind of contamination and maintaining the right style of agriculture. I’m always amazed to learn the contributions of temples in olden time. The person who introduced tea first was a priest and in this area it was a priest who started to grow this wonderful fruit. Of course the lords of areas encouraged him to keep going, too. Temples have been and should continue to be centers of culture.

Agriculture is a long lasting investment. We also enjoyed viewing beautiful colored maple leaves. This year’s autumn leaves are very beautiful. I heard this years’ are the best in the last ten years.

 

Tea ceremony in November

Sunday, November 18th, 2012

November is a special season for tea ceremony. They start to use a kind of fireplace used charcoal called “ Ro “. From November to April, they use “ Ro “ to supply hot water to make tea. Demonstrating how to handle charcoal is a kind of important skill of tea ceremony. For the host of the tea gathering, sharing the same fire with their guests as they surround the hearth is very meaningful thing to do. Probably that’s because fire is a significant thing for human beings. It’s a very nice thing to hear the sound of water boiling in the iron pot in the quiet tea room. People say it’s like listening to the murmuring of pine trees along the windy beach.

It’s kind of sad but reminds me of the beginning of my favorite season. As for the tea itself, they open a new tea caddy since this is the best time to taste it.

 

We also have seasonal confectionery called “ inokomochi “. “ Inoko “ means baby wild boars. Since wild boars are fertile, people wish for the prosperity of families. Inokomochi doesn’t look colorful but it tastes much better than it looks. Sweet sesame paste is covered with rice cake and soybean flour. This persimmon one is another seasonal pleasure. 

Here is a real persimmon and it is said that it contains a lot of vitamin C to make your skin beautiful and prevent you from catching cold and hangover. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 November is my birthday month and it should be a beautiful time but many things are happening these days. As I watch BBC World News, it covers major events happening in the Middle East whereas NHK News covers only domestic political issues. In reality, the Japanese economy is affected by the world and now we have a lot of relationships internationally through so called globalism. We can’t go without knowing what’s happening in the world. People might think that Japanese are indifferent to the issues or simply stupid. I hope the quality of mass media in Japan goes up. I also wish the people who are fighting would stop one time to have tea and talk.  

Tea Bushes and clouds

Monday, November 5th, 2012

I was just taking a walk around my neighborhood when I found myself surrounded by tea bushes. The harvesting season is already over and the bushes have been neatly trimmed while the ground below them is scattered with fallen leaves and strewn with mown grass, both of which help to fertilize the bushes. I also noticed some dainty white tea flowers among the trimmed leaves of the tea bushes. I love their round shape. They belong to the camellia family, but tea flowers are much smaller than other camellias.

 

The weather was perfect for taking a walk. I am really lucky in having sweeping views of Suruga Bay in front of me and tea terraces stretching up towards Mt. Fuji behind me. Since it has got colder Mt. Fuji is now wearing its white cap. I saw a line of cloud above the peak. When Fuji has umbrella-like clouds floating above it, that means it’s going to rain. At the same time I saw this strange cross-shaped cloud in the western sky. I don’t know what it means though. Anyway, according to the weather forecast, it’s going to be rainy tomorrow.

Green Tea and Japanese confectionery YOKAN

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

   

After long hot summer days, it finally got much cooler – sometimes quite cold, even. Now I think it’s time to enjoy hot green tea with Yokan.

 

This is my favorite Yokan made by Shintsuru in Suwa ( Nagano ).This shop was founded more than 130 years ago and since then they have been making Yokan by hand without compromising on anything. They still burn Japanese oak wood to cook the azuki beans. I heard Japanese oak keeps a perfect temperature for cooking beans. They make many kinds of confectionery but this shio-yokan is the most famous. Yokan basically contains beans, sugar and agar. And salt is added for this shio-yokan. These days we have a lot of variation with sesame, green tea or chestnuts etc.

 

The idea of yokan is originally from China. If I break down the two Chinese character “ yo” and “ kan”. “ Yo” means sheep and “ kan” means soup. In China, people had sheep soup and Japanese priests brought back the idea

However priests were vegetarians so they changed the ingredients and made something completely different. Instead of meat, they used cooked beans.

 

I also think the combination of green tea and yokan is the best. They help each other to enhance their taste. Some people add some sugar to green tea but I can’t imagine the taste. I heard taking liquid with sugar is very bad for teeth. But after eating something sweet and taking green tea is a very good combination.

 

Or the people who want to lose weight can simply drink green tea. I don’t know if the substance of the green tea helps you lose weight but drinking tea when you are hungry makes your stomach full and it makes you lose weight.

All in all, thinking about green tea and confectionery is very interesting.